Winged or Lugged Spear Lance Head - spearhead with buttcap counterbalance

Winged or Lugged Spear Lance Head - spearhead with buttcap counterbalance

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$60.15
SKU:
M(LU).20k35.ics12
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  • Product Description

     

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    • Weight: 510g.
    • Length: 42.5 cm.
    • Blade: 28 cm.
    • Blade width (widest point): 12 cm.
    • 10cm circ. at base and tapering slightly (hollow to fit shaft / pole).
    • Width of hollow for the shaft: 2.7 cm.

     

    Buttcap

    • Length: 10.2 cm.
    • Weight: 347g.

     

    Specially made for re-enactors. This spear head has a flattened tip, with 3mm thick flat edges each side, so it's safe for film work and simulated combat (although a lobed tip is somewhat safer). Like all good weapons and armour, this is not stainless steel, so keep lightly oiled or use silcone spray. There are two parts to this product, it also has a cone shaped end fixture (buttcap).

    The winged (also lugged or barred) spear was a common type of thrusting spear during the early Middle Ages. It consisted of a leaf or lozenge shaped head, beneath which on the socket there were prominent wings. The earliest use of barred spears for hunting is recorded by Xenophon in the 4th. century BC and illustrations of Roman examples are known. Its use in war, however, seems to relate to German tribes in the Early Middle Ages, particularly the Franks, although it was also used by the Vikings. The type is commonly illustrated in Early Medieval Art, including the Bayeux Tapestry and the Golden Psalter of St. Gallen. The winged spear is shown used by both cavalry and infantry. Although some authors claim the intention of the wings was to prevent the weapon from penetrating too deeply into an enemy, others see them as an aid to spear-fencing. Whatever the truth – they looked good (and perhaps, as military fashion dictated, that’s all that mattered). In the later Middle Ages a number of polearms evolved from the winged spear.

    With Buttcap

    Buttcaps were used to counter balance a spear, protect the end from splintering, and provided a last resort back up, should the spear tip be broken off in battle. A spear with a buttcap is not much good for throwing but is easier to wield as a thrusting weapon.

     

    SEE THE VIDEO: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybhFDsZAnh8&feature=youtu.be

     

    Free Delivery for Australia and New Zealand.

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    1. Winged or Lugged Spear Lance Head - spearhead with buttcap counterbalance

      I bought mine a few years ago, and didn't get a chance to review. I would recommend this to any ones collection or those who just like good craftsman ship. on 16th Jan 2020

  • Product Videos

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